To Tibidabo

Ever since re-watching episodes of Friends and seeing that one episode where Joey tells the story of how he was backpacking through Western Europe and hiking up Mount Tibidabo, it was a sort of reminder of how close I am to such amazing feats, that I must take advantage of.

Where is it?

Assuming my embedding skills are up to date, below you´ll see a map of the exact location of Tibidabo, just click on “Directions” to figure out how to get there. Heading up there we took the train up to Peu de Funicular and then the funicular up to Vallvidrera Superior, following that you can take the bus to the top or you can take a 15 minute walk and enjoy the sights along the way.

Walking up you still get views of the city of Barcelona and if you didn´t know that there was even more higher up, you might even be satisfied with just seeing them and not going any further. Fortunately for you and I, we know there´s more ahead!

Walking from Vallvidrera Superior up to Tibidabo

Generally the first thing that comes to mind when you hear the word Tibidabo is the large structure at the top of the mountain. It´s known as Temple Expiatori del Sagrat Cor.

And when you start making your way up, it´s pretty much the first thing that you notice and it’s rather amazing both in photo and in person.

What is it?

It´s a Roman Catholic Church that was built because of rumours that a protestant church and a hotel-casino  was going to be built over there. It took just under 60 years to build this feat of Neo-Gothic architecture with the building beginning in 1902 and completing in 1961.

Temple Expiatori del Sagrat Cor

What else is there?

Aside from the epic views and great areas to walk around, they´ve also stuck an amusement park to keep things interesting.

You don´t have to pay to be up there and walk around for most of the area but there are sections cut off to paying customers only, like some of the viewing platforms and play areas for the children. There´s more than enough though to keep you entertained and sights to see if you decide to take the free entry route. When we were up there, we just walked around and found it more than suffice in not making any purchases.

One thing I´ll especially recommend is to go up to Tibidabo for just before sunset because it´s quite simply stunning.

If you decide to head up to this place, leave your thoughts of it in the comments!

Spanish Class Reflection

Spanish class reflection will not be about reviewing how the class was taught or if it necessarily improved my ability in Spanish. This article is about what else I learnt about how to learn and what it made me realise about life tasks in general.

There are so many ways to learn something, from immersion to little by little but all have the commonality that if you’re going to succeed in it, you’ll be needing consistency.

It has been a few weeks since the end of the course and I’ve practised here and there but not at the same level, and although I’ve retained a fair amount, it’s not so fresh in mind. This may have been affected by my recent trips away with different languages been spoken but this doesn’t mean I’ve given up.

Consistency is the key to success and social interaction is a growth that can’t really be achieved in another manner, or at least so easily.

I recently saw a quote on my Instagram feed which something along the lines of, “if you can’t find anyone to join you, go by yourself and you’ll find people who think the same way as you.”

Your group of friends might be great but you’re unlikely to match on every single interest and that’s where networking and exploring new ventures can open up avenues to meeting people that you match on different areas. Joining a Spanish course allowed me to meet people who all had the same common goal, and yet we all had such different personalities, it was somewhat enlightening.

I’ll leave it here with these two lessons I learnt from the course:

Lesson 1: Be consistent in your pursuit of goals and you’ll see it develop towards that

Lesson 2: Social interaction shouldn’t be limited but widened through exploring, either through finding new places or trying new activities

 

Learning Spanish

When you’ve lived in a foreign country for more than nine months and still aren’t semi-conversational in the language, it’s probably time to start taking classes.

I have tried to learn Spanish by myself through using Babbel, Duolingo, many other apps, general self-study and multiple other methods, except one, sitting in a classroom with others trying to learn.

There’s an accountability that you have when you’re in a classroom and there’s homework to do, and a sort of competitive nature to not be the worse one there!

You’re more motivated and driven to learn, at least in theory 🙂

It’s not that I don’t want to learn, it’s that sometimes you need that little extra push, or need to try something new. So I signed up for a four week intensive course, Monday to Thursday, 11:30-13:30.

We’ll see how my Spanish develops and if it works, carry on and see how I can improve upon it. If it doesn’t work too well, then I’ll seek to understand why and how I can apply myself better in the future.

And that’s my little tidbit for today.